FAQFAQ   SearchSearch  MemberlistMemberlistRegisterRegister  ProfileProfile   Log in[ Log in ]  Flint Talk RSSFlint Talk RSS

»Home »Open Chat »Political Talk  »Flint Journal »Political Jokes »The Bob Leonard Show  

Flint Michigan online news magazine. We have lively web forums


FlintTalk.com Forum Index > Political Talk

Topic: City and Flint Housing partnr with Norstar

  Author    Post Post new topic Reply to topic
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Cuomo donors got grants to build - Times Union
www.timesunion.com/local/article/Cuomo-donors-got-grants-to-build-7420804.php
May 7, 2016 - After it received the subpoena, the Cuomo administration acknowledged that Bharara's investigation — which has been under way for at least a year ... The companies include Conifer Realty of Rochester, COR Development of the Syracuse area and Norstar Development, a company based in Ontario, ...


Last edited by untanglingwebs on Sun Jan 07, 2018 12:05 pm; edited 1 time in total
Post Sun Jan 07, 2018 11:57 am 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Albany

The federal subpoena received by Gov. Andrew Cuomo's administration in late April seeks information about any actions taken by certain Executive Chamber officials that might have benefited several major developers in New York, according to a person with knowledge of the subpoena.

The companies include Conifer Realty of Rochester, COR Development of the Syracuse area and Norstar Development, a company based in Ontario, Canada, that has significant operations in Buffalo. Several other companies were identified in the subpoena, which was issued by the office of U.S. Attorney for the Southern District Preet Bharara.

No one has been charged with wrongdoing in the ongoing investigation, and the entire scope of Bharara's inquiry remains unclear. A spokesman for his office declined to comment.

While each of the companies is engaged in a wide range of projects with state and local governments, all three are involved in the development of affordable housing — an industry that has quietly proven to be among the governor's most generous supporters.

After it received the subpoena, the Cuomo administration acknowledged that Bharara's investigation — which has been under way for at least a year — had raised questions of "improper lobbying and undisclosed conflicts of interest" related to the portfolio of projects in the "Buffalo Billion" initiative and related upstate development deals. The administration has launched its own probe, which will be conducted by outside investigator Bart Schwartz.

The three developers that are among the subjects of the subpoena all have received lucrative affordable housing grants or tax breaks from the state's affordable housing agency, the Department of Homes and Community Renewal — including some for projects that HCR staff initially scored lower than those of competitors.

Developers of affordable housing projects can apply for several forms of state support or investment. One of the most popular comes in the form of annualized federal tax credits, an asset that can be packaged and sold to investors to help fund a development. HCR said its staff assesses each application and scores them based on whether the proposal advances various policy objectives. Separate reviews are done for financing and design. In the past, the staff has also provided a determination as to whether a project is "feasible," "infeasible" or "feasible but not recommended," though the agency said that terminology hasn't been in use for two years.


A score lower than a competitor's is not necessarily the end of a project. HCR's leadership — which like that of all other executive agencies operates under the direction of the governor — can override a low staff assessment, including through what's referred to as a "Commissioner Determination," to unlock the credits. HCR said that over the past five annual rounds, 21 such determinations have been issued.

At the same time, Cuomo's campaign has received large contributions from the industry.

Next week developers will meet at the Marriott Marquis hotel in Manhattan for the annual downstate gathering of the New York State Association for Affordable Housing, an influential lobbying trade group.

But a related event that for several years was held the night before the gathering has been canceled: a posh fundraiser for Cuomo.

The decision was made by NYSAFAH in January in part because of concerns from some developers that the timing of the event could create a negative perception, according a person with knowledge of the matter.

A spokesman for the group disputed that the event was moved for any reason other than "practical and logistical" issues that allowed the organization's small staff to better prepare for the fundraiser outside the annual conference. He said such a move was under consideration for several years.

One of the companies mentioned in Bharara's subpoena, COR Development, controls most of the largest development projects in the Syracuse area, including regional projects under scrutiny that are connected to SUNY Polytechnic, the public research university formed in 2014 by the merger of the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering in Albany and the SUNY Institute of Technology in Utica.

According to a financial disclosure form filed by Joe Percoco, Cuomo's former executive deputy secretary, COR paid him between $50,000 and $75,000 in "consulting fees" in 2014 while he was also managing Cuomo's re-election campaign. COR, however, has repeatedly insisted that it "did not hire, retain or pay" Percoco, and has said it is cooperating with Bharara's probe.

COR and its related entities, senior leadership and their spouses have given at least $250,000 to the governor's campaign since January 2010.

In October 2013, COR President Steven Aiello and lobbyist Todd Howe, one of the figures of interest in the federal probe, met with top officials at Homes and Community Renewal. (Whiteman Osterman & Hanna, the large Albany law firm for which Howe operated a Washington, D.C.-based subsidiary, confirmed Friday that he is no longer an employee.) William Eimicke, a consultant who served as former Gov. Mario Cuomo's housing czar, was also present.

HCR spokeswoman Charni Sochet said the meeting concerned the "redevelopment of Mercy Hospital in Watertown and the Inner Harbor in Syracuse. Applications were not submitted (with the agency) for either project." She declined to elaborate.

COR has also interacted with HCR as part of its annual competitive disbursement of affordable housing grants and tax credits.

In 2011, the agency awarded $2.3 million from the state Housing Trust Fund to the affordable housing development of a related company, COR Watertown, called Beaver Meadow. That benefit came despite an agency staff finding that the project was "feasible but not recommended," according to a 2014 audit of the Housing Trust Fund by state Comptroller Tom DiNapoli.

DiNapoli's office found systemic problems in the program's administration. Notably, the audit said HCR management did not adequately document decisions to award funding to projects that scored lower than competitors — a failing that challenged "the integrity of the program," the comptroller's office said.

According to the audit, over a five-and-a-half-year period ending in December 2013, the agency had awarded funding to six projects that HCR's staff review had deemed "infeasible" and 13 deemed "feasible but not recommended."

Beaver Meadow got a technical score of 23 out of a possible 100, according to records obtained by the Times Union through an open records request.

HCR noted the project was the only "feasible" applicant for HTF funding from its region that year, and said the project advanced long-standing housing goals for the Fort Drum area.

A COR Development spokeswoman declined comment when asked about its donations to Cuomo.

COR is not the only generous Cuomo supporter named in the administration subpoena to have won competitive tax credits for projects with subpar grades.

Norstar Development, a Canadian company with extensive U.S. holdings, has given at least $157,000 to Cuomo's campaign since the beginning of 2010. Board of Elections records show that the bulk of the giving ($90,000) came from Norstar entities based in Irving, Texas, a Dallas suburb. The company has also given money to the governor through its Buffalo offices and subsidiary companies ETC Commercial and Mineola Contracting.

The president of Norstar's United States division, Richard Higgins, is a former state housing commissioner who served under governors Hugh Carey and Mario Cuomo.

"Over the last 20 years, Norstar, as an affordable housing developer, has applied for funding in competitive processes, both successfully and unsuccessfully, for numerous affordable housing projects," Higgins said in a Saturday email. "Norstar also has been a longtime supporter of Gov. Cuomo, who has provided more resources and support for affordable housing than any governor in recent memory."

In 2012 competitive bidding for state dollars, a Norstar project called Creekwood Phase II in Watertown was awarded $2.4 million from the Housing Trust Fund and a $1.4 million annual tax benefit — which can be taken for the first 10 years the finished project is operating — from the federal Low Income Housing Tax Program.

The award came despite the project being ruled by the HCR staff "feasible but not recommended," according to DiNapoli's audit.

HCR officials told the Times Union that the project advanced state housing goals within the Fort Drum region, and the "not recommended" determination was due to initial staff concerns the market would not support the project. The development is currently at 95 percent capacity, the agency said.

In the 2013 funding competition, a Norstar development in Buffalo called Waterfront Apartments Phase 1 got a $1 million annual federal tax credit for a decade from HCR.

The project had scored lower with agency staff than competitors, which required then-HCR Commissioner Darryl Towns to issue a "Commissioner Determination" — an action allowing him to "allocate low-income housing credit to a project irrespective of its point ranking."

According to Towns' letter, the project was chosen over higher-scoring rivals because it furthered state housing goals through the "redevelopment of Mitchell-Lama housing units," and represented a "coordinated investment" with a local government housing partner.

The city of Buffalo had pre-qualified for a separate award of $400,000 and identified the project as a top priority, the letter said.

A third affordable housing developer mentioned in Bharara's subpoena, Rochester-based Conifer Realty, and its executives and related entities have given Cuomo's campaign at least $80,000 since January 2010. That included $30,000 from Timothy Fournier, Conifer's president and CEO.

In a 2012 housing funding round, the company's development Corpus Christi Apartments in Rochester got $2.4 million from HCR's HOME program, and $1.2 million in annual low-income housing credits.

Once again, because the project had a lower score with HCR's staff than competitors, Towns had to issue a Commissioner Determination to release the credits.

In his letter, Towns explained the money provided "coordinated investment" with Rochester, and community revitalization of an area through the partial demolition and re-use of a dilapidated, long-vacant building "having a blighting impact on the surrounding areas."

In the 2013 funding competition, meanwhile, HCR awarded $2.2 million from the Housing Trust Fund and $715,000 in annual federal low-income credits to Biltmore Crossing, a joint project of Conifer and a nonprofit group, Providence Housing. It is located in the town of Horseheads in Chemung County.

Again, the award required a Commissioner Determination, with the letter signed in this case by the housing agency's assistant commissioner, Sean Fitzgerald. The exception, he wrote, was granted because it would serve families in a "non-urban" area, and the local approval process had been "timely commenced." The letter noted that all other conditions for the tax credit had been met, including "site control and financial commitments."

HCR said the determination in the Biltmore project was required merely to provide the project with additional time to secure local approvals, and was not required due to low scoring.

Conifer declined comment Friday.

In a statement, HCR spokeswoman Stephanie Davis noted the agency "has granted 180 awards over the last five years through its annual competitive funding application for tax credits and low interest loans, and these projects were given the same consideration as all the others. All decisions are made solely by DHCR based on the same criteria."

Cuomo's campaign said Saturday that no donation, regardless of its size, has any effect on official actions.

cseiler@timesunion.comcbragg@timesunion.com
Post Sun Jan 07, 2018 12:00 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

"The companies include Conifer Realty of Rochester, COR Development of the Syracuse area and Norstar Development, a company based in Ontario, Canada, that has significant operations in Buffalo. Several other companies were identified in the subpoena, which was issued by the office of U.S. Attorney for the Southern District Preet Bharara.

No one has been charged with wrongdoing in the ongoing investigation, and the entire scope of Bharara's inquiry remains unclear. A spokesman for his office declined to comment.

While each of the companies is engaged in a wide range of projects with state and local governments, all three are involved in the development of affordable housing — an industry that has quietly proven to be among the governor's most generous supporters.

After it received the subpoena, the Cuomo administration acknowledged that Bharara's investigation — which has been under way for at least a year — had raised questions of "improper lobbying and undisclosed conflicts of interest" related to the portfolio of projects in the "Buffalo Billion" initiative and related upstate development deals. The administration has launched its own probe, which will be conducted by outside investigator Bart Schwartz.

The three developers that are among the subjects of the subpoena all have received lucrative affordable housing grants or tax breaks from the state's affordable housing agency, the Department of Homes and Community Renewal — including some for projects that HCR staff initially scored lower than those of competitors.

Developers of affordable housing projects can apply for several forms of state support or investment. One of the most popular comes in the form of annualized federal tax credits, an asset that can be packaged and sold to investors to help fund a development. HCR said its staff assesses each application and scores them based on whether the proposal advances various policy objectives. Separate reviews are done for financing and design. In the past, the staff has also provided a determination as to whether a project is "feasible," "infeasible" or "feasible but not recommended," though the agency said that terminology hasn't been in use for two years. "
Post Sun Jan 07, 2018 12:04 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

The HUB Flint

Hashtag help wanted: Flint aims to land $30 million HUD grant with residents support
By TheHUB on 11/15/2017Comments Below

Hashtag help wanted: Flint aims to land $30 million HUD grant with residents support

Flint residents have already accepted the challenge to rise from the proverbial ashes of a public health crisis and now the city can bring home a victory for the entire state.

The Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Choice Neighborhoods Planning Grant competition is a chance to win as much as $30 million to improve living options and build the community – but the application team needs support. Using the hashtag #mychoiceisflint, city officials have launched a social media campaign to help advocate for success leading to the Nov. 22 submission deadline.

“Funding for this grant would be transformational for Flint,” says Suzanne Wilcox, acting director of the city’s Department of Planning and Development.


Flint’s Acting Department of Planning and Development Director Suzanne Wilcox is encouraging Flint’s residents to reflect on what they like about the city and to promote it on social media – – #mychoiceisflint. Photo courtesy K. Stevenson
As the only known grant applicant from Michigan in a nationwide process, the whole state should “pull behind” Flint and promote the city through social media posts and “shares” using the #mychoiceisflint endorsement, she says. Citizens, elected officials, athletes, performers, community organization leaders and other advocates are asked to help build momentum.

“It just represents a tremendous amount of hard work and coalition-building leveraged by a huge number of community partners,” adds Wilcox.

Central to the application are South Flint’s Atherton East Apartments, a low-income housing complex whose residents must be relocated. Atherton was built on a flood plain, in violation of zoning laws, about 50 years ago and residents have faced hazards that require they be given new, HUD-approved accommodations, says city planner Kristin Stevenson.

“Our plan actually proposes three different locations for Atherton East in the city of Flint,” she says.


Clark Commons could become the first phase of historic, mixed-income housing is Flint wins a Choice Neighborhoods Planning Grant competition. Illustration courtesy City of Flint
Clark Commons, a mixed-income housing development in North Flint, would include some of about 250 current Atherton East residents. The overall vision, says Stevenson, is to create 300 mixed-income housing units at multiple locations, including Clark Commons’ 62 energy-efficient apartments on North Saginaw near Williams.

Calling the vision a “game-changer” for the community, she says Flint has no designated mixed-income housing.

“It’s all about de-concentration of poverty,” Stevenson adds. “It’s not just, ‘Here are all these public housing units and we’ll put them over here.’ Stable neighborhoods are formed when they’re integrated and diverse in all ways.”


City Planner Kristin Stevenson asserts that stable neighborhoods are formed when “they’re integrated and diverse in all ways.” Photo courtesy Americorps
HUD will announce planning grant winners next spring and construction of Clark Commons could begin in July. The proposal for relocation of Atherton East residents and the larger mixed-income housing initiative will move forward regardless of whether Flint’s chosen, Stevenson says, but a chunk of the $132 million available would accelerate the city’s work. Partners with the city include the Flint Housing Commission and Norstar Development, which has applied for low-income housing tax credits to begin construction of Clark Commons.

Added features of the proposal, like improved health and safety initiatives and improved access to transportation, would also be possible with HUD’s grant.

Photos, quotes, and even simple words of support for the campaign can be posted to @mychoiceisflint, using Twitter and Instagram, while Facebook users can showcase the hashtag on the page “South Flint Community Plan.”

“Lots of people live, work and play here, so we want to get them to reflect on what they like about the city,” says Stevenson.

As lead planner for the proposal, Stevenson has been involved with the effort for almost three years and she says it would help for both Flint and non-Flint residents using social media to “talk about why they’re proud of this town.”

“It’s really about leveraging what’s already happening and all the investment in the community,” she adds, “and saying, ‘HUD, help us do more.’”
Post Sun Jan 07, 2018 12:24 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Tenants of Shoreline Apartments told to get out | wivb.com
://wivb.com/.../tenants-of-shoreline-apartments-told-to.../
May 12, 2016 - For years the owners, Norstar Development U.S.A., LLC, have assured tenants the demolition of their apartment complex would be phased in over a period of years, and no one would be displaced. It is now a different story, and tenants are worried because trying to find affordable housing on such short ...

wivb.com
WIVB.COMTenants of Shoreline Apartments told to get out
By Al Vaughters, News 4 Reporter
Published: May 12, 2016, 7:48 pm Updated: May 12, 2016, 7:54 pm
Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) 2K+Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)2K+ Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)


BUFFALO, N.Y. (WIVB) – There are 172 families on edge, at the Shoreline Apartments on Niagara Street, after the owners told them they have to get out by November 1.

For years the owners, Norstar Development U.S.A., LLC, have assured tenants the demolition of their apartment complex would be phased in over a period of years, and no one would be displaced. It is now a different story, and tenants are worried because trying to find affordable housing on such short notice is nearly impossible.

“I think we are being scammed,” said one tenant, “I think we are being railroaded.” That feeling was shared by many of the residents who contacted Call 4 Action after learning they only have about 5 months to move out so their homes can be demolished.

Norstar Development, which is based in Canada, announced years ago, they would be bulldozing the entire 400-unit complex, but the residents would be moved around gradually, as new housing units are built to replace the outdated apartments.

Resident Michael Morehouse feels Norstar officials have deceived the tenants, because they were led to believe time was on their side. “Now last week, we get this bombshell that everybody has get to move out by November 1.”

The tenants, many of whom receive rental assistance, are leery of Norstar’s real intentions. Morehouse believes Norstar wants to bring in higher income tenants, “I think they are trying to get the fixed income people out–the minorities, the disabled–out of here, and get the people that have those jobs in here.”

Roy Gilbert, who lives at Shoreline with his two daughters, said, “They are trying to bring the higher people from the outskirts of the City of Buffalo down here, and take the lower income people and move them out.”

Reva McDuffie, a 30-year resident of Shoreline agreed, “I think it is politics, that is what I think it is. They just want us out, and put everybody else in.”

Linda Goodman, Vice President of Norstar Development, USA, said company officials are trying to cause as little disruption for the tenants as possible, “Although we could not give them anything definitive, we are working on a plan to help with assistance financially.”

Goodman said, there will be help for tenants who are forced to move, “Our staff in the office will be helping them with identifying other sites, other complexes that the people might want to move to.”

Just don’t let the tenants down, said resident John Schmidt, “They promised that nobody would be displaced. They promised they would help us move, especially the elderly and disabled. That was a fair plan–they need to keep their promises.”

Linda Goodman said Norstar will be sending out updates to the residents in the next few days with more information on their plans, but before they can move forward, the plans have to be approved by the Buffalo Planning Board, and that could happen at the Planning Board’s meeting in June.
Post Sun Jan 07, 2018 12:34 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

KM_C654e-20171121155238 - Genesee County Metropolitan ...
gcmpc.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/FPR-11-17-12-Packet_for_Website.pdf
Nov 14, 2017 - applying for the Implementation Grant to bring the 3+ years of planning to fruition. The. City of Flint, Flint Housing Commission, Norstar Development, and other community partners will implement the South Flint Community Plan's three core goals: Housing,. People, Neighborhood. Housing: Over 300 new ...




Atherton East built in 1960's in a Flood Plain building 313 uits and a one on one replacement of the 192 Atherton East units; 121 units of moderate income and unrestricted market units. $30 million investment combined with $271 million partnership investment and a city contribution of $4.7 million is $300 million committed Flint is using $272,768 to demolish 1425 N. Saginaw.
Post Sun Jan 07, 2018 12:53 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

In the US, mixed housing developments aren't working for low-income ...
https://www.citymetric.com/.../us-mixed-housing-developments-arent-working-low-in...
Feb 13, 2015 - Over the past 20 years, the United States federal government and local housing authorities have replaced hundreds of troubled public housing projects with mixed-income developments. Has it worked? It depends who you ask: scholars, elected officials, housing developers, and low-income residents ...
Post Sun Jan 07, 2018 1:26 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

New StatesmanCityMetric Intelligence



HORIZONS HOUSING February 13, 2015
In the US, mixed housing developments aren't working for low-income families
By L. Vale and S. Shamsuddin

Mixed-income housing in Chicago, built on the site of a now-demolished public housing estate. Image: Authors' own.
For decades, public housing stood as the most architecturally visible and politically stigmatized reminder of urban poverty in many US cities. Originally built to accommodate an upwardly mobile segment of the working poor, by the 1970s public housing had become a last-resort option for low-income elderly and the poorest of families. Critics blamed public housing for concentrating poverty, encouraging welfare dependency, increasing crime and violence, and contributing to urban disinvestment and decline.

Over the past 20 years, the United States federal government and local housing authorities have replaced hundreds of troubled public housing projects with mixed-income developments. Has it worked?

It depends who you ask: scholars, elected officials, housing developers, and low-income residents continue to disagree. A key area of contention has to do with the term “mixed-income” – which, though widely used, is rarely defined.

In our research into public housing, we’ve concluded that if policymakers fail to agree on a clearer definition of mixed-income housing's aims and attributes, the sought-after benefits of public housing reinvention will remain elusive.

A new vision for public housing
Beginning in the early 1990s, policymakers proposed demolishing low-income public housing projects and replacing them with mixed-income housing. The idea was that this would reduce concentrated poverty and revitalize deteriorating neighborhoods. Between 1993 and 2010, Congress appropriated more than $6bn to fund these efforts through the US Department of Housing and Urban Development’s HOPE VI (Housing Opportunities for People Everywhere) program.

Today, “the projects” are now far less visually prominent in many cities, as more than 250,000 public housing units – including some of the most notorious high-rise complexes, like Chicago’s Robert Taylor Homes and Detroit’s Frederick Douglass Homes – have been demolished.



Detroit's Frederick Douglass Homes development. Image: Mikerussell at Wikimedia Commons.

Supporters contended that the HOPE VI program would create safe and attractive neighborhoods to serve all incomes. Some former residents of demolished projects would gain a place to live in the new communities, while others could use subsidized housing vouchers to move into diverse neighborhoods (presumed to be less deprived than their former homes).

Detractors countered that mixed-income redevelopment would lead to a loss of much-needed “hard units” of public housing. As a result, many low-income households would merely be dislocated to other pre-existing, impoverished neighborhoods, where they would lack established social networks.

Others added that income mixing is a thinly veiled attempt by a neoliberal state to commit public funds to gentrification. Additionally, most scholars have found that many of the assumed benefits of mixing low-income residents with their higher-earning counterparts – such as role modeling and social networking – fail to positively impact the lives of low-income families.

By contrast, other aspects of mixed-income developments seem more promising: enhanced security, increased investment in neighborhoods, and higher expectations for management.

What does mixed-income mean, anyway?
To assess whether mixed housing developments actually work, we need to decide what we mean by the term "mixed-income". However, if there is little consensus on what mixed housing actually does, there is even less of a consensus on what mixed-income housing is.

Our research shows that the term “mixed-income” encompasses a heterogeneous set of projects, which differ widely in several areas. These include:

The distribution and range of household incomes included in the redevelopment effort;
The spatial strategy for mixing different income groups together;
The proportion of dwelling units designated for home owners and for renters;
The length of time that selected housing units are guaranteed to be subsidized for low-income families;
The relative income levels of residents living in the surrounding neighborhood.
Even though all 250+ HOPE VI public housing redevelopment projects since 1993 have received funding from the same federal program and are bound by the same basic federal regulations, local housing authorities and their partners exercised considerable discretion over the final form of mixed-income projects. This discretion reveals distinct choices about where and how low-income families should be housed.

Based on our preliminary analysis of HOPE VI proposals sent to the US Department of Housing and Development, most redevelopment efforts stipulated that families at the lowest end of the income scale – in other words, those in most desperate need of housing – should constitute a minority of residents in new mixed-income communities. Some redevelopments even sought to have a majority of units occupied by relatively wealthy households who would pay market-rate rents.

Conversely, other HOPE VI proposals allocated the overwhelming majority of apartments to low-income public housing residents. Still others skipped market-rate apartments entirely and instead favored substantial tiers of “affordable” housing that included smaller subsidies for those working families who might never think to apply for public housing, but still had relatively low incomes.

In this latter brand of housing community, residents have a variety of income levels – and can still be considered “mixed” – even though all or nearly all of those incomes can still be regarded as “low”. Such initiatives have been implemented both before the HOPE VI program began, and under its auspices.

Unfortunately, these narrow-mix arrangements constitute the minority of mixed-income housing proposals. Because vastly different social, economic, financial, and spatial mixes share the name “mixed-income,” many kinds of communities have been too easily lumped together under the same term. HOPE VI seems best conceptualized as an umbrella that covers quite a large variety of local practices and strategies.



In 2006, protesters in post-Katrina New Orleans objected to using demolished public housing as the primary site for building mixed-income communities instead targeting wealthy neighborhoods. Image: Subculture Photography via Flickr.

Who’s left out? Large numbers of extremely low-income households that once called public housing home.

Even if there are positive outcomes from mixed-income housing, important unresolved questions remain: which type of mixed-income housing plan will be best for achieving such gains? Do only some residents benefit, while others simply get displaced to other high-poverty areas?

In other words, before we can accurately evaluate the positive and negative effects of mixed-income communities, we must first agree on what we mean by the term mixed-income. Without disentangling this definitional knot, mixed-income redevelopment of public housing will remain deeply ambiguous as a practice.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Lawrence Vale is the Ford Professor of Urban Design and Planning and Shomon Shamsuddin is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Post Sun Jan 07, 2018 1:34 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
untanglingwebs
El Supremo

Low-Income Housing Shows How Tax Credits Funnel Dollars to the ...
https://www.nakedcapitalism.com/.../low-income-housing-shows-how-tax-credits-fun...
Jan 29, 2016 - How tax credits to subsidize social programs like low income housing are really welfare for the rich
Post Sun Jan 07, 2018 1:44 pm 
 View user's profile Send private message  Reply with quote  
  Display posts from previous:      
Post new topic Reply to topic

Jump to:  


Last Topic | Next Topic  >

Forum Rules:
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

 

Flint Michigan online news magazine. We have lively web forums

Website Copyright © 2010 Flint Talk.com
Contact Webmaster - FlintTalk.com >